• Family History Stories,  Mayflower Heritage

    My Great-Grandparents (x10 and x11) were Pilgrims on the Mayflower

    During the March Break, mom and dad and I went to the Canadian Canoe Museum to learn more about my Métis and voyageur heritage on my mom’s side. Across the street from the museum was St. Peters Cemetery. My dad remembered that my great-parents were resting there so we popped by to see them. Marjory Lottie Reed Koster was Grace Koster Outram’s mother. Grandma Grace died in the 1970s so I didn’t get to know her but I spent a lot of time with her sister, my great-Aunt Arleigh.

     

    When I got home I spent some time exploring my family tree on Ancestry.ca. I told dad that I thought I was going to find a good story behind Great-grandma Marjory Lottie Reed. So, after a couple days of research, I found this…

    Here are some details following a direct line to the Mayflower:

    The journey from Peterborough to Michigan to Massachusetts to the Mayflower and England…

    • Lottie Reed was born in Michigan in 1879. When she married William Joseph Koster they moved to Peterborough. They worked and raised a family, staying in Peterborough, Ontario until they died.
    • Lottie’s parents, Merton Reed (1853-1930) and Effie Reed (1860-1935), lived in the Michigan area their whole lives.
    • Effie’s parents, Herman L Jones (1832-1914) and Harriett Cole (1837-1918) also lived in the Michigan area.
    • Herman L Jones’ parents, Simeon Paul Jones (1799-1888) and Mary Ann Chaffee (1805-1875) lived in the New York and Michigan areas.
    • Simeon’s parents, Sargent Jones (1775-1843) and Hannah Paul (1776-1877) lived in the Massachusetts and Michigan areas.
    • Sargent’s parents, Benjamin Jones (1736-1821) and Susannah Baker (1743-1775) lived in the Massachusetts and Michigan areas.
    • Benjamin’s parents, Cornelius Jones (1694-1744) and Abigail Hawkes (1701-1746), lived in the Massachusetts area.
    • Abigail Hawkes’ parents, John Hawkes (1668-1748) and Abigail Floyd (1679-1732), lived in the Massachusetts area.
    • John’s parents, John Hawkes SR (1633-1694) and Sarah Cushman (1641-1694), lived in the Massachusetts area. They are my 9th great-grandparents.

    And here is where it gets really interesting:

    John Hawkes SR (1633-1694): My Ninth Great-Grandfather.

    • John’s parents, Adam Hawkes (1605-1671) and Anne Brown (1603-1669), arrived in America in 1630 as part of the Winthrop Fleet, a group of 11 ships from England to New England.
    • According to a note on Ancestry.ca by another descendent, Adam was a Cow Commissioner and Surveyor in Massachusetts. “He and his family were known as the first known white settlers in the wilderness then called Lynn and now known as Saugas, Massachusetts.”
    • Adam was granted 100 acres of land where iron ore was later found–which resulted in a lot conflict.
    • Anne Brown‘s first husband was named Thomas Hutchinson (1586-1630). They had five children together between 1620 and 1629. One of their children, Elizabeth Hart Hutchinson, was accused of being a witch in the New England Salem Witch Trials in 1692.
    • Anne Brown has a nickname of “the widow.” It looks as though Thomas Hutchinson died on the ship in 1630. She marries Adam Hawkes the same year.

    Sarah Cushman (1641-1694): My Ninth Great-Grandmother.

    There is an incredible monument in Plymouth dedicated to my 10th great-grandmother Mary Allerton and the Cushman family.  Click here to read more about it. And this is a statue in Brewster Gardens, Plymouth, that is dedicated to her.

    This is just a couple days of research…I look forward to digging deeper into these stories. It’s amazing what we can learn about our roots online.

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